Before & After: DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch

I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me! 

Since then, you have been on an epic journey with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had to go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.

 

BEFORE & AFTER

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch

 

Materials 

 

Choosing Paint Colours

I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the finish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish. 

 

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

 

Painting, Painting, Painting

Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life, work life and Celeste's naps to get it done. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram ReelHere are the steps:

  1. Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and hidden away from the kids. 
  2. Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth. 
  3. Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings. 
  4. Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off.
  5. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment.

A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.

 

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!  Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                    AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     PHOTO OF DOOR KNOBS      Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy. Like, ridiculously easy. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. See for ourself here in this quick Instagram Reel. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     FINAL IMAGES     Thank you  Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

 

 

Choosing Finishes

The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!

 

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

 

Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors 

I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors and replace them with something else for added texture. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at every major low cost department store, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.

I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Triibe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass fitter on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. If you you want to use your own glass and you're looking for something truly unique, try sourcing stained, frosted or coloured glass from your local tip shop. They have plenty of secondhand sheets lined up ready to be used for a project like this. Most glass suppliers will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:

  1. Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place.
  2. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly. 
  3. Check you can pop out the middle timber panels without affecting the profile of the doors. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass. If this is the case, give rattan a go by cutting it to size and gluing it directly onto the glass!
  4. Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm.
  5. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate.
  6. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly. 
  7. Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go.
  8. Screw the doors back onto the hutch. I used a couple of books to help prop up each door while doing so. It took a bit of effort because some paint had made it's way into the screw holes but with a bit of grit, the nails went in with a screwdriver. You could try using an electric drill but I was nervous it would split the timber, and thought it would be safest to hand screw the nails back in, even if took longer. 

 

Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

 

Installing New Door Knobs

Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were. 

Once the doors were finished, I lined the edges of the glass with paint tape from Bunnings and touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase with paint. I didn't realise but while I was painting, some of it splashed onto the glass. The ppaint had dried onto the glass but I easily removed it with a paint scraper from Bunnings (also known as joint knife). Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy, which you can see here in this quick Instagram ReelIt was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite impressed at how easy it was and it's got me thinking - where else can I add door knobs at home lol. It took one minute to do both, seriously. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch, and I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!

 

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

 

 

The Big Reveal 

Thank you so much for sticking with me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing! 

 

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch 

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!   Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had to go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                            AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch     Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass Screwdriver    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and hidden away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!  Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                    AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     PHOTO OF DOOR KNOBS      Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy. Like, ridiculously easy. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. See for ourself here in this quick Instagram Reel. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     FINAL IMAGES     Thank you  Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!        Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Screw the doors back onto the hutch. I used a couple of books to help prop up each door while doing so. It took a bit of effort because some paint had made it's way into the screw holes but with a bit of grit, the nails went in with a screwdriver. You could try using an electric drill but I was nervous of the power it would create, and thought it would be safest to hand screw the nails back in, even if took longer.     Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing New Door Knobs  Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy, which you can see here in this quick Instagram Reel. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        The Big Reveal   Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch   Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch                 I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!   Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had to go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                            AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch     Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass Screwdriver    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and hidden away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!  Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                    AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     PHOTO OF DOOR KNOBS      Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy. Like, ridiculously easy. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. See for ourself here in this quick Instagram Reel. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     FINAL IMAGES     Thank you  Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!        Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Screw the doors back onto the hutch. I used a couple of books to help prop up each door while doing so. It took a bit of effort because some paint had made it's way into the screw holes but with a bit of grit, the nails went in with a screwdriver. You could try using an electric drill but I was nervous of the power it would create, and thought it would be safest to hand screw the nails back in, even if took longer.     Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing New Door Knobs  Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy, which you can see here in this quick Instagram Reel. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        The Big Reveal   Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch   Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!   Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had to go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                            AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch     Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass Screwdriver    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and hidden away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!  Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                    AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     PHOTO OF DOOR KNOBS      Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy. Like, ridiculously easy. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. See for ourself here in this quick Instagram Reel. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     FINAL IMAGES     Thank you  Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!        Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Screw the doors back onto the hutch. I used a couple of books to help prop up each door while doing so. It took a bit of effort because some paint had made it's way into the screw holes but with a bit of grit, the nails went in with a screwdriver. You could try using an electric drill but I was nervous of the power it would create, and thought it would be safest to hand screw the nails back in, even if took longer.     Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing New Door Knobs  Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy, which you can see here in this quick Instagram Reel. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        The Big Reveal   Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch   Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch                 I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!   Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had to go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                            AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch     Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass Screwdriver    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and hidden away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!  Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                    AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     PHOTO OF DOOR KNOBS      Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy. Like, ridiculously easy. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. See for ourself here in this quick Instagram Reel. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     FINAL IMAGES     Thank you  Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!        Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Screw the doors back onto the hutch. I used a couple of books to help prop up each door while doing so. It took a bit of effort because some paint had made it's way into the screw holes but with a bit of grit, the nails went in with a screwdriver. You could try using an electric drill but I was nervous of the power it would create, and thought it would be safest to hand screw the nails back in, even if took longer.     Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing New Door Knobs  Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy, which you can see here in this quick Instagram Reel. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        The Big Reveal   Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch   Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!   Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had to go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                            AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch     Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass Screwdriver    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and hidden away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!  Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                    AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     PHOTO OF DOOR KNOBS      Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy. Like, ridiculously easy. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. See for ourself here in this quick Instagram Reel. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     FINAL IMAGES     Thank you  Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!        Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Screw the doors back onto the hutch. I used a couple of books to help prop up each door while doing so. It took a bit of effort because some paint had made it's way into the screw holes but with a bit of grit, the nails went in with a screwdriver. You could try using an electric drill but I was nervous of the power it would create, and thought it would be safest to hand screw the nails back in, even if took longer.     Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing New Door Knobs  Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy, which you can see here in this quick Instagram Reel. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        The Big Reveal   Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch   Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch                 I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!   Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had to go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                            AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch     Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass Screwdriver    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and hidden away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!  Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                    AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     PHOTO OF DOOR KNOBS      Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy. Like, ridiculously easy. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. See for ourself here in this quick Instagram Reel. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     FINAL IMAGES     Thank you  Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!        Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Screw the doors back onto the hutch. I used a couple of books to help prop up each door while doing so. It took a bit of effort because some paint had made it's way into the screw holes but with a bit of grit, the nails went in with a screwdriver. You could try using an electric drill but I was nervous of the power it would create, and thought it would be safest to hand screw the nails back in, even if took longer.     Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing New Door Knobs  Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy, which you can see here in this quick Instagram Reel. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        The Big Reveal   Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch   Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

 I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!   Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had to go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                            AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch     Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass Screwdriver    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and hidden away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!  Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                    AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     PHOTO OF DOOR KNOBS      Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy. Like, ridiculously easy. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. See for ourself here in this quick Instagram Reel. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     FINAL IMAGES     Thank you  Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!        Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Screw the doors back onto the hutch. I used a couple of books to help prop up each door while doing so. It took a bit of effort because some paint had made it's way into the screw holes but with a bit of grit, the nails went in with a screwdriver. You could try using an electric drill but I was nervous of the power it would create, and thought it would be safest to hand screw the nails back in, even if took longer.     Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing New Door Knobs  Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy, which you can see here in this quick Instagram Reel. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        The Big Reveal   Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch   Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch                 I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!   Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had to go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                            AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch     Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass Screwdriver    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and hidden away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch I can't believe we are finally here - the big reveal! If you haven't already, make sure you check out this quick Instagram Reel I made to share the process of up cycling this bookshelf and hutch. This DIY project has been over three (lonnggg) months in the waiting. You may remember back in February I bought an old timber bookshelf and hutch off Facebook Marketplace for a steal. $250 total to be exact. I had been looking for a unique piece of furniture to store all my treasured secondhand and thrifted ceramics, kitchenware and glassware for a while and Jason suggested I try Facebook Marketplace. I hadn't been searching for long when I found these gorgeous pieces and they came as a package deal, both which came from a loving home and were custom built for the owners back in 1996. The owners were moving into a smaller home in Buderim and no longer needed them, which was great news for me!  Since then, you have been on a journey of epic proportions with me over on Instagram helping me make all the decisions with this upcycle project and I honestly could not have transformed both pieces without your valuable guidance. When they arrived I wasn't sure if I should paint them or not, mostly because I loved the warm colour of the stained timber and truthfully, I have never been a fan of painting furniture. It just always looked so flat to me. I threw my conundrum out to you guys on Instagram and you voted I should paint it. And that was that. If I was going to upcycle these pieces, I knew I had go all in or nothing. Read on to see how I upcycled these beautiful pieces.     BEFORE                                                                                    AFTER  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Materials   Old cloth Sanding block/sponge from Bunnings  Resene "Sourdough" in semi-gloss (water based) Water based white primer Cutting in brush Microfibre rolling brush Paint tray  Drop sheet "Pika" cabinetry knobs from ABI Interiors  Rebate power tool  Glass cut to size  Translucent silicone glazing sealant for glass    Choosing Paint Colours  I knew I wanted the colour to be neutral and to pair back nicely with the rest of the furniture in our house. We can see the bookshelf and hutch when we are sitting in our lounge area, so I didn't want the pieces to stand out or be an eyesore in our large open planned living area. A friend suggested I take inspiration from the shadows created in the folds of our linen curtains, and that's what I did. I ended up choosing 6 beautiful colours in different neutral shades from Resene. The colours were Leather, Okey Dokey, Sourdough, Double Biscotti, Biscotti and Half Biscotti. Look, it's no surprise that I chose colours named after food and after testing the colours on a sheet of white painted timber and moving it around the house to capture the colour in various stages of natural and artificial light, we narrowed down and chose our two favourite colours. We couldn't decide and had many discussions, so I decided to throw out the decision my Smor Kitchen family over on Instagram and Sourdough won the most votes, which incidentally was my preference! Once the colour was chosen, I was still concerned about the fish and the paint falling flat. While our whole house is matte (including our kitchen benches, kitchen cupboards and timber floors), I knew that a matte finish would look a little cheap so I decided to opt for a semi-gloss finish.      Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Painting, Painting, Painting  Painting the bookshelf and hutch took me a long time and that's mostly because I had to find any spare time I had in between home life and work life. Having two businesses and two kids, plus "all the other things" doesn't allow for a lot of time to focus on detailed projects like but I got it done and I couldn't be happier. See how the painting came together in this quick Instagram Reel. Here are the steps:  Remove the hutch doors and set the nails, knobs and hinges aside in a safe place. I put mine in a ziplock bag and away from the kids.  Wipe the entire surface clean with a damp cloth.  Sand the surface back using a hand held sanding block/sponge (which I have linked above) with a grit of 80 to 120, as recommended to me by an expert at Bunnings.  Paint two coats of white primer all over the timber (inside and outside) using the roller. The first coat will look very rough and if you have grooves in the panels like my pieces did, you'll need to use a cutting in brush to get into those nooks and cranny's. Pay extra special attention to the hinges. If you happen to get any paint of them, just wipe the paint off with a damp cloth. Because the paint is water based, it's easy to wipe off straight away, so don't wait for it to dry before trying to clean it off. Paint two coats of your final colour. Trust me, it's worth the effort. Take your time, pop on a podcast and enjoy being present in the moment. A note about the primer - the stain on the original timber seeped through the first layer of primer but after the second coat, it was gone. The experts at Haymes Paint in Noosa recommended to always apply two coats of white primer when painting timber furniture before applying the final colour. If you don't do this, the stain in the existing timber might (or most definitely) seep through and affect the tone of your final colour. And no one wants that.     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch      Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     PHOTO OF DOOR KNOBS      Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy. Like, ridiculously easy. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. See for ourself here in this quick Instagram Reel. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     FINAL IMAGES     Thank you  Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!        Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        Choosing Finishes  The next decisions to make were the finishes, in particular the door knobs and the hutch doors. I knew I wanted the door knobs to match our brushed brass kitchen mixer from ABI Interiors for continuity throughout the house, but I couldn't decide between the Pika and Elsa cabinetry knobs. Again, I threw the decision out to my lovely community on Instagram and the votes were overwhelmingly in favour of Pika. And that's what I chose - happy dance!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing Glass In The Hutch Doors   I also wanted to pop out the middle panels of the hutch doors. I knew by adding a little "wow" factor to the hutch doors, that I would be able to take this upcycle from just an everyday painting and cabinetry door knob switch out DIY project into something truly special. I was interested in popping out the panels and installing glass or rattan. Once again, I was undecided so no surprises here, I asked what everyone thought on Instagram. The majority voted for rattan but this didn't sit right with me. Rattan has been having a very big mainstream moment for the last few years and now that there are versions of rattan at major low cost department stores, it just didn't feel special nor did it really sit with our interior style.  I had considered seeing if I could source some lovely stained secondhand glass from our local tip shop, but then my lovely bestie from We Are Tribe suggested I try installing the hutch doors with reeded glass, which is also known as fluted glass. I'm not going to lie, it really helps having a bestie as a very successful interior designer. I fell in love with the idea right away and she connected me with a glass maker on the Sunshine Coast that could cut reeded glass to size and also install it. So happy! If you're interested in doing this yourself, call your local glass supplier and see if they can cut glass to size, and whether they can source the glass for you or if you can bring in your own. Most will cut glass to size no matter what the glass is and where it comes from! You can get them to install it (like I did) or you can do it yourself. Here are the steps including the materials you will need to use:  Remove the doors from the hutch. Then remove the existing door knobs and put the screws aside in a safe place. Paint the doors first. Refer to my steps above in the "Painting, Painting, Painting" section to find out how to do this properly.  Check to if you can pop out the middle timber panels. If this is not possible, you may not be able to replace them with glass.  Check and double check the measurements of your piece of glass, including the thickness. The thickness of the reeded glass from the supplier I used was 6mm. Rebate the edges using a rebate tool. I got our builder to help me with this. We could only rebate the frames by 4mm due to the (beautiful) profile of the doors, which was totally ok. If you don't mind too much what the doors look like on the inside, it's totally fine if the glass is a little thicker than your rebate. Get the glass cut to size and make sure the edges are rounded off slightly.  Apply a translucent silicone glazing sealant specifically for glass (which I have linked above in the Materials section) around the edges of the rebated frame, then gently place the glass in, push down slightly and immediately wipe off any excess silicone that may have been squeezed out between the timber and glass. Let it dry as per the instructions and then the doors are good to go. Screw the doors back onto the hutch. I used a couple of books to help prop up each door while doing so. It took a bit of effort because some paint had made it's way into the screw holes but with a bit of grit, the nails went in with a screwdriver. You could try using an electric drill but I was nervous of the power it would create, and thought it would be safest to hand screw the nails back in, even if took longer.     Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch     Installing New Door Knobs  Speaking of the hutch doors, they have beautiful weathered hinges on them and instead of cleaning and polishing them up, I decided to leave them as is. I love mixing old with new, so having new paint, and new door knobs, and new reeded glass, I knew I had to leave the existing hinges as they were.   Once the doors were finished, I touched up some marks and dints that occurred during the glass installation phase. Then I screwed in the new door knobs from ABI Interiors - this was so easy, which you can see here in this quick Instagram Reel. It was as simple as pushing the screw through the existing screw hole and then twisting the knob onto the screw. I was actually quite shocked at how easy it was. It took one minute to do both, seriously. Then I screwed the doors back onto the hutch. I cannot tell you how satisfying that moment was! And here we are. Yay!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch        The Big Reveal   Thank you so much for sticking by me during this upcycle transformation. As I said earlier, I could not have done this without your guidance and vested interest over on Instagram. It was also so lovely seeing a few of you create your own Before & After upcycled bookshelf and hutch projects during this DIY - thank you so much for sharing these projects with me, and for swapping all your tips and tricks. You guys are truly amazing!     Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch   Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before and After DIY Upcycled Bookshelf and Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch  Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch Before-and-After-DIY-Upcycled-Bookshelf-and-Hutch

 

 


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